Retailers already fear U.S. holiday ‘shipageddon’; now here come vaccines | Reuters

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) — Deliveries of holiday gifts purchased online at major retailers could get delayed by something far more critical — COVID-19 vaccines.

FILE PHOTO: The word «COVID-19» is reflected in a drop on a syringe needle in this illustration taken November 9, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

Pharmaceutical companies including Pfizer and Moderna as early as mid-December could begin sending inoculations to U.S. healthcare workers and nursing home residents.

FedEx and United Parcel Service could make space for those shipments on cargo planes by bumping off packages from Amazon.com, Walmart, Target and other retailers.

“FedEx is prioritizing vaccines,” company spokeswoman Bonny Harrison told Reuters.

While vaccines could displace some FedEx Express air shipments, they will not affect the separate FedEx Ground network that depends on trucks and delivers the majority the company’s holiday volume, Harrison said.

UPS, without elaborating, said it is prepared for holiday and vaccine shipments. UPS and FedEx are transportation providers to the federal government’s Operation Warp Speed vaccine project.

The additional cargo could cause problems for retailers who were already worried about a year-end “shipageddon” in the United States, where peak holiday demand and a pandemic-fueled surge in online orders of everything from food to furniture risk overwhelming delivery networks.

During the peak holiday season, many more products use air versus ground transportation, said Alan Amling, distinguished fellow at the University of Tennessee’s Global Supply Chain Institute.

The vaccine is “going to strain the industry, but when it comes to the trade-offs, I’ll take the vaccine,” said Amling, a former UPS executive.

“It could not start at any worse time,” said Satish Jindel, president of ShipMatrix, a delivery tracking and management firm. He does not expect impatient shoppers to give the carriers a blanket pass for putting the nation’s health before their last-minute holiday gifts.

“Seeing how American consumers are handling the recommendations for safety during the pandemic, they will be more upset about their Christmas online orders being delayed,” Jindel said.

Retailers like Target and Best Buy launched Christmas promotions before Halloween, the earliest ever, to spread deliveries of online orders across a longer time frame. Those and other projects are designed to prevent networks from buckling when demand spikes.

“This would include vaccines that may be approved for distribution during the holiday peak season,” said Mike Parra, chief executive for DHL Express Americas, a UPS and FedEx rival. Melissa Dorko, 41, and her husband are ordering holiday gifts weeks earlier than usual this year.

“We are never this buttoned up,” said Dorko, a mother of three who used to be a last-minute Christmas shopper on Amazon.

Reporting by Lisa Baertlein in Los Angeles; Editing by David Gregorio

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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YouTube bans One America News Network from posting new videos for a week | Reuters

3 Min Read

FILE PHOTO: Silhouettes of mobile device users are seen next to a screen projection of YouTube’s logo in this picture illustration taken March 28, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

(Reuters) — YouTube said on Tuesday it had barred the right-wing outlet One America News Network from posting new videos for a week after it broke the site’s rules against content that claims there is a guaranteed cure for COVID-19.

A spokeswoman for YouTube, the video-sharing platform owned by Alphabet’s Inc’s Google, said OAN had also been suspended from monetizing its videos due to repeated violations of the COVID-19 misinformation policy and other rules. OAN will have to reapply to be allowed to monetize again.

President Donald Trump has promoted OAN, calling it a “great alternative” to Fox News in a tweet this month. The outlet has amplified Trump’s unsupported claims of voter fraud in the U.S. presidential election.

YouTube said it has a “three-strikes policy” before an account is removed and this constituted OAN’s first strike. OAN did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.

The YouTube spokeswoman said an OAN video, now removed, had violated its coronavirus misinformation rules by claiming that hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malarial drug touted by Trump despite a lack of scientific evidence, was a cure for COVID-19.

YouTube and other major online platforms are under scrutiny from lawmakers and researchers to curb misinformation on their sites. Following the November election, Reuters identified several YouTube channels making money from ads and memberships that were amplifying debunked accusations about voting fraud.

At a congressional hearing last week with the CEOs of Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc, Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal criticized Google, YouTube’s owner, saying it had been given a “pass” and was being rewarded for its “timidity” in content moderation.

Four Democratic senators also sent a letter on Tuesday to YouTube’s Chief Executive Officer Susan Wojcicki urging the video platform to remove content that they said spread misinformation on election results and pressing for information on measures taken ahead of the runoff U.S. Senate elections in Georgia.

Reporting by Elizabeth Culliford; Editing by Tom Brown

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Pennsylvania officials ask court to reject Trump campaign’s election appeal | Reuters

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FILE PHOTO: Sidney Powell, an attorney later disavowed by the Trump campaign, participates in a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani at the Republican National Committee headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

(Reuters) — Pennsylvania officials asked the U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals to reject an appeal made by U.S. President Donald Trump’s campaign, according to a court filing on Tuesday.

Lawyers for Trump’s campaign have asked the court to halt the “effect” of the battleground state’s results. The Pennsylvania results were certified earlier on Tuesday, further dimming Trump’s already long-shot quest to change the outcome of the election.

The Trump campaign is appealing a decision made by a lower court judge, who rejected claims of inconsistent treatment of mail-in ballots. Some counties told voters they could fix defective ballots, such as a missing “secrecy envelope,” while others did not.

The campaign wants to add back allegations it dropped from the case, including a claim that its due process rights were violated.

In appealing the decision, the Trump campaign said it was focusing on the “narrow” question of whether U.S. District Judge Matthew Brann improperly refused to let them amend their lawsuit a second time.

“The district court did not abuse its discretion, and its denial of leave to amend should be affirmed,” lawyers for Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar wrote in the filing.

Reporting by Makini Brice and Jonathan Stempel; Editing by Noeleen Walder and Chris Reese

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‘America is back,’ Biden says, as he dumps Trump’s foreign policy approach | Reuters

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WILMINGTON, Del. (Reuters) — President-elect Joe Biden said on Tuesday the United States will be “ready to lead” again on the global stage, turning the page on President Donald Trump’s unilateralist policies as he pledged to work together with America’s allies.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden announces his national security nominees and appointees at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., November 24, 2020. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Introducing his new foreign policy and national security team, the Democratic former vice president signaled he intends after taking office on Jan. 20 to steer the United States away from the “America First” nationalism pursued by Trump.

The Republican incumbent has unsettled many U.S. allies, in Europe and elsewhere, with an antagonistic approach toward the NATO alliance and trade relations, abandonment of international agreements and warm relationships with authoritarian leaders.

Biden said his team, which includes trusted aide Antony Blinken as his nominee for U.S. secretary of state, would shed what the president-elect described as “old thinking and unchanged habits” in its approach to foreign relations.

“It’s a team that reflects the fact that America is back, ready to lead the world, not retreat from it, once again sit at the head of the table, ready to confront our adversaries and not reject our allies, ready to stand up for our values,” Biden said at the event in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware.

The world is much changed since Democrats were last in the White House four years ago. China is on the rise and emboldened, Russia has sought to further assert its clout, U.S. influence has waned as it has pulled out of various accords, and American moral authority has been dented by turmoil at home.

Biden also has tapped Jake Sullivan as national security adviser, Linda Thomas-Greenfield as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Alejandro Mayorkas as secretary of homeland security and John Kerry as envoy on climate-related issues. They appeared with Biden and underscored his message.

U.S. foreign policy under a Biden administration is likely to take more of a multilateral and diplomatic approach aimed at repairing Washington’s relationships with key U.S. allies and pursue new paths on issues such as climate change.

Biden said he has been struck in calls with roughly 20 world leaders “by how much they’re looking forward to the United States reasserting its historic role as a global leader.”

Slideshow ( 4 images )

His promise to embrace alliances, including in the Asia-Pacific region, follows a deterioration in bilateral ties between the United States and China, the world’s top two economies, that has triggered comparisons to the Cold War.

This final year of Trump’s administration was marked by frequent China-bashing as the two powers sparred over China’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, deteriorating freedoms in Hong Kong and territorial issues in the South China Sea.

While China is unlikely to find a soft alternative to Trump with Biden, diplomats and analysts expect a more measured tone and intensified efforts to strengthen alliances to counter Beijing.

In his remarks, Biden said that working with allies would help keep America safe without engaging in “needless military conflicts.” He did not reference the country’s longest war — the Afghanistan conflict — as Trump moves to reduce U.S. forces.

TRANSITION MOVES FORWARD

Biden has moved swiftly to assemble his team and make Cabinet choices after defeating Trump in the Nov. 3 election. Trump has waged a flailing legal battle to try to overturn the results, falsely claiming the election was stolen from him through widespread voting fraud.

Biden urged the Senate to give his nominees who require confirmation by the chamber “a prompt hearing” and expressed hope he could work with Republicans “in good faith to move forward for the country.”

“Let’s begin that work … to heal and unite America as well as the world,” Biden added.

Some Republican senators, however, indicated they may be prepared to stand in the way of his Cabinet appointments. Marco Rubio, a Foreign Relations Committee member, wrote on Twitter that Biden’s Cabinet picks “will be polite & orderly caretakers of America’s decline.”

Trump has said he will never concede the election but after weeks of limbo his administration on Monday finally gave the green light for the formal transfer of power to begin. That process had been held up despite Biden emerging as the clear winner and world leaders recognizing him as the next president.

In another sign that Trump had all but accepted his election loss, the White House gave the go-ahead for Biden to start receiving the president’s daily intelligence briefing.

Critics have said Trump’s refusal to accept the results undercut the incoming administration’s ability to combat the intensifying pandemic that has killed about 259,000 Americans and left millions more without jobs.

Pennsylvania became the latest pivotal state on Tuesday to certify that Biden had won. The Nevada Supreme Court on Tuesday also confirmed Biden had won the state, sending the results to Nevada’s Democratic governor for final certification.

Reporting by Trevor Hunnicutt, David Morgan, Patricia Zengerle, Humeyra Pamuk; Additional reporting by David Brunnstrom, Doina Chiacu, Lisa Lambert, Karen Freifeld, Noeleen Walder and Tom Hals; Writing by Paul Simao: Editing by Ross Colvin and Will Dunham

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Cruises given green light if companies agree to pay for Covid outbreak repatriations

The Government has given cruises the green light to restart once companies agree to pick up the bill if passengers have to be repatriated because of a Covid outbreak.

The cruise industry has been in suspended animation since July, when the Foreign Office issued blanket advice against all cruise ship travel following a string of Covid outbreaks around the world.

The advice has made it impossible for travellers to get holiday insurance and effectively halted a sector which the industry estimates to be worth almost £10 billion to the UK economy.

In an interview with The Telegraph, Grant Shapps, the Transport Secretary, said the cruise sector had worked "very, very hard" to guarantee Covid-secure travel but added that, for the final clearance, the Government wanted reassurance that it would pick up the cost of repatriation.

The Foreign Office had to spend around £6 million flying hundreds of passengers stranded after cruise ships were hit by Covid outbreaks, trapping many in quarantine on the quayside.

"Provided that [the agreement on repatriation] is case, this green lights cruises as long as they are Covid secure and using all the tests," said Mr Shapps.

In a joint statement, the Cruise Lines International Association and the UK Chamber of Shipping welcomed the Government taskforce’s report on kick-starting travel and commitment to restarting cruising but said there was still "no certainty" over when it could happen.

"The Government must now set a timeline to safely start domestic cruises in early 2021, and international cruises to destinations for which travel corridors are open from spring 2021," it said. "As the Government rightly acknowledges, the industry needs this clarity and confidence to start planning for operational restart of cruise ships, which can take up to three months."

The problems have been highlighted by P&O Cruises, which has cancelled sailings until at least April. The company, owned by FTSE 100 operator Carnival, blamed "ever-changing guidance around international travel" and differing regulations across European ports.

The cancellation means that P&O will have been out of action for more than a year. Its last cruise set sail in March.

The Crown’s royal protocol adviser on the ‘anoraks’ who love to spot mistakes

From a “sloppy” salute by the Queen to the Duke of Edinburgh shooting pheasants in August, mistakes in The Crown have not escaped sharp-eyed viewers.

But the Netflix show’s expert in royal protocol has explained how far he goes to get the details right, describing people who point out errors as “anoraks”.

Major David Rankin-Hunt, a member of the Royal household for 33 years, said his attention to detail extended to making sure every umbrella in a garden party scene was furled as tightly as those kept at Buckingham Palace.

He also interrupted scenes in which Josh O’Connor appeared as the Prince of Wales after spotting that the flaps on the pockets of his double-breasted suits were visible. The real Prince of Wales tucks them in.

“I felt it was my job to try and minimise the opportunities for people, the anoraks out there, to find something to criticise,” Major Rankin-Hunt said during in an interview for The Crown’s official podcast.

Major Rankin-Hunt was registrar at the Lord Chamberlain’s Office and later the administrator of the Royal Collection, a position he held until his retirement in 2014. He was also secretary of a working group set up to organise royal funerals.

His duties include advising cast members on etiquette, including how to bow, ensuring that furniture and props are accurate representations of Palace furnishings.

He explained: “At garden parties, for instance, umbrellas are always tightly furled. It’s almost a badge of office. So we’d go around furling the umbrellas very tightly. Also, when it rains, you don’t open your umbrella. If you’re on duty at the garden party, you get wet.

“The Prince of Wales almost invariably has his flaps of his pockets tucked in. It’s a sort of military thing. So I was always going around stuffing flaps back into pockets. The man in the street wouldn’t necessarily know it, but as a lot of my old colleagues watch The Crown, they would pick those things up.”

Major Rankin-Hunt said that working on the set of The Crown was more fun than working at the Palace. “It was nice to be introduced to the real world. I don’t mean that in a disparaging way of the Royal household but obviously it’s an institution that is perhaps a tiny bit old-fashioned in some ways,” he said.

Dow tops 30,000 on vaccine progress, Biden transition | Reuters

4 Min Read

NEW YORK (Reuters) — U.S. stocks rallied on Tuesday, with the Dow piercing the 30,000 level for the first time, as investors anticipated a 2021 economic recovery on progress on coronavirus vaccines and the formal clearance for President-elect Joe Biden’s transition to the White House.

Each of the 11 major S&P sectors was higher, led by economically sensitive stocks such as industrials, which climbed to a record, along with the financials, up 2.8% and energy, up 4.2%.

President Donald Trump finally gave the green light for the formal transfer of power to begin on Monday, a process that was delayed for weeks despite Democrat Joe Biden emerging as the clear winner in the elections. The General Services Administration told Biden he could formally begin the hand-over process.

“You had the GSA transitioning and Trump saying he is going to cooperate. That is a positive,” said Thomas Martin, senior portfolio manager at Globalt Investments in Atlanta.

“Nobody was worried about it, but just the fact you’re greasing the wheels for the transition instead of trying to throw a monkey wrench in them is decent news.”

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 395.22 points, or 1.34%, to 29,986.49; the S&P 500 gained 51.48 points, or 1.44%, at 3,629.07 and the Nasdaq Composite added 140.41 points, or 1.18%, at 12,021.05.

Recent data suggesting a COVID-19 vaccine could be available before the end of the year has put the S&P 500 on course for its best November ever and sparked demand for value-linked stocks that were hammered following the coronavirus-driven crash earlier this year.

U.S. officials said on Tuesday they plan to release 6.4 million COVID-19 vaccine doses nationwide in an initial distribution after the first one is cleared by regulators for emergency use.

Sentiment this week was also boosted by reports that Biden planned to nominate former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen as Treasury Secretary, which could shift the focus heavily toward efforts to tackle growing economic inequality.

Electric-car maker Tesla Inc jumped 6.7%, boosting its market value to over $500 billion, as investors lapped up its shares in the run-up to its addition to the S&P 500 index.

Boeing Co gained 2.8% after European regulators gave draft approval to its 737 MAX jets, paving the way for a formal flight clearance in January.

BlackRock Inc, the world’s largest asset manager, on Monday upgraded U.S. equities to “overweight,” turning bullish on quality large-cap technology companies and small cap firms that tend to perform well during a cyclical upswing.

Still, with coronavirus cases surging by the day and millions of Americans still unemployed, some analysts suggested the U.S. stock market could be prone to a pullback from record levels in the next few weeks.

Advancing issues outnumbered decliners on the NYSE by a 3.29-to-1 ratio; on Nasdaq, a 1.95-to-1 ratio favored advancers.

The S&P 500 posted 54 new 52-week highs and no new lows; the Nasdaq Composite recorded 192 new highs and nine new lows.

Reporting by Chuck Mikolajczak; Editing by Richard Chang

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Sarah Ferguson designs Duchess-branded biscuit and tea collection 

The Duchess of York has been involved in many business ventures over the years, from Weight Watchers ambassador to children’s author.

For her latest project, she has turned her hand to something different, personally designing her own range of tea and biscuits called the Duchess Collection, in aid of her new charity Sarah’s Trust. 

The collection, featuring a logo depicting two rearing winged horses, will raise money for families bereaved during the coronavirus pandemic.

However, those hoping the collection might open the door for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex to create their own such merchandise will be disappointed.

Sources close to the couple acknowledged that it would be frowned upon if the Sussexes did so and suggested it was highly unlikely.

When they stepped back from their roles as working royals they agreed not to use their HRH titles and were banned from using their Sussex Royal brand, which they had already registered as a global trademark for a broad range of items.

It is understood that concerns were also raised about the couple using their Duke and Duchess titles, as courtiers were “petrified” that they might trade on them for commercial gain.

The Duchess of York, who is not a member of the Royal Family, is not prevented from using her title, acquired through marriage, and did not need to seek permission from the Royal Household.

Her new collection includes a tea and biscuit gift set, a pin brooch in memory of a late friend and children’s face masks.

A tea and biscuits gift set designed by Sarah, Duchess of York

Credit: Duchess Collection

A commemorative brooch with a “loving memory” logo was designed in memory of one of her oldest friends, who recently died of cancer aged just 59.

“The forget-me-not flower and the York Rose symbolise new life while honouring those who have died,” the Duchess said.

A Brew for the Crew gift set of English tea and biscuits costs £35, while a box containing just tea will be available for £20 and individual packets of biscuits cost £4.

The Duchess founded Sarah’s Trust in June.

Winter sun getaways boom as travel companies exploit quarantine cut with deals

Demand for winter sun breaks surged on Wednesday after travel companies exploited the cut in quarantine by offering deals for families desperate to get away.

Ryanair was the first airline out of the stocks by offering 20 per cent off all flights from December 1.

It has also added 21 additional flights from the UK to its Christmas schedule flying to and from countries including Belgium, Greece, Romania, Spain and Portugal.

Other airlines indicated they were reviewing their schedules and offers but competitor airlines such as easyJet and Jet2 were thought likely by industry insiders to follow suit.

Wild Frontiers, a travel company that specialises in bespoke holidays and small groups, has also laid on new trips for the Christmas and New Year period to destinations including Egypt, Sudan and Guatemala.

Capacity to key travel corridor destinations

It followed Grant Shapps, the Transport Secretary, announcing on Tuesday that from December 15, travellers coming into the UK from “red list” countries will be able to leave their 14 day quarantine if they test negative on the fifth day.

Holidaymakers returning to the UK will be able to book their day five tests in advance from a list of approved companies to be published by the Government. 

They will include fast LAMP tests, which cost up to £80 and return results in an hour, and “gold standard” PCR tests, which can cost between £120 and £180. Travellers are expected to be able to post their tests, attend private test sites or have them couriered.

Airlines on Tuesday urged the Government to go further and introduce pre-departure testing up to 72 hours before flying which could mean sidestepping quarantine on arrival.

However, Mr Shapps downplayed such a move. “At the moment, from a medical science point of view, that doesn’t really work. You need to have a period during which the incubation could have taken place, during which people haven’t been mixing with others," he said.

He told The Telegraph on Monday that the next step he favoured would be the use of rapid lateral flow tests, which would be taken daily for seven days to enable people to freely leave their homes, avoiding quarantine entirely.

Biden says U.S. ‘ready to lead’ again, vows to work with allies | Reuters

6 Min Read

WILMINGTON, Del. (Reuters) — President-elect Joe Biden said on Tuesday the United States will be “ready to lead” again on the global stage, turning the page on President Donald Trump’s unilateralist policies as he pledged to work together with Washington’s allies.

Introducing his new foreign policy and national security team, the Democratic former vice president signaled that he intends to steer the United States away from the “America First” nationalism pursued by Trump after taking office on Jan. 20.

The Republican incumbent has unsettled many U.S. allies, in Europe and elsewhere, with an antagonistic approach toward the NATO alliance and trade relations, abandonment of international agreements and warm relationships with authoritarian leaders.

Biden said his team, which includes trusted aide Antony Blinken as his nominee for U.S. secretary of state, would shed what the president-elect described as “old thinking and unchanged habits” in its approach to the world.

“It’s a team that reflects the fact that America is back, ready to lead the world, not retreat from it, once again sit at the head of the table, ready to confront our adversaries and not reject our allies, ready to stand up for our values,” Biden said at the event in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware.

The world is much changed since Democrats were last in the White House four years ago. China is on the rise and emboldened, Russia has sought to further assert its influence, U.S. influence has waned as it has pulled out of various accords, and American moral authority has been dented by turmoil at home.

Biden also has tapped Jake Sullivan as national security adviser, Linda Thomas-Greenfield as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Alejandro Mayorkas as secretary of homeland security and John Kerry as envoy on climate-related issues.

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With new national security team, Biden stresses alliances, U.S. leadership

Biden says preparing to meet 'challenges at hand' as election wraps up

U.S. foreign policy under a Biden administration is likely to focus on more of a multilateral and diplomatic approach aimed at repairing Washington’s relationships with key U.S. allies and taking new paths on issues such as climate change.

Biden said he has been struck in calls with roughly 20 world leaders “by how much they’re looking forward to the United States reasserting its historic role as a global leader over the Pacific, as well as the Atlantic, all across the world.” Biden added that it is his core belief that “America is strongest when it works with its allies.”

“That’s how we truly keep America safe without engaging in needless military conflicts, and our adversaries in check and terrorists at bay,” Biden said, also mentioning the challenges of controlling the current pandemic and potential future ones, climate change, nuclear proliferation, cyber threats and the spread of authoritarianism.

Biden did not reference the country’s longest war — the Afghanistan conflict — as Trump moves to reduce U.S. forces.

Members of Biden’s team underscored his message.

“I want to say to you,” Thomas-Greenfield said, “America is back. Multilateralism is back. Diplomacy is back.”

Slideshow ( 7 images )

Biden has moved swiftly to assemble his team and make Cabinet choices after defeating Trump in the Nov. 3 election. Trump has waged a flailing legal battle to try to overturn the results, falsely claiming the election was stolen from him.

Biden urged the Senate to give his nominees who require confirmation by the chamber “a prompt hearing” and expressed hope he could work with Republicans “in good faith to move forward for the country.”

“Let’s begin that work … to heal and unite America as well as the world,” Biden added.

Slideshow ( 7 images )

Not long after Biden’s event, Trump made an appearance at the White House for the annual ceremonial pardoning of a turkey ahead of Thursday’s Thanksgiving holiday, remarking, “That’s a lucky bird.”

TRANSITION MOVES FORWARD

Trump has said he will never concede the election but after weeks of limbo his administration on Monday finally gave the green light for the formal transfer of power to begin. That process had been held up despite Biden emerging as the clear winner and world leaders recognizing him as the next president.

Critics have said Trump’s refusal to accept the results and approve the transition of power to Biden undermined U.S. democracy and undercut the incoming administration’s ability to combat the intensifying coronavirus pandemic that has killed about 258,000 Americans and left millions more without jobs.

Trump’s strategy had hinged on stopping certain states that he lost from certifying their results before the electors from the 50 states and the District of Columbia convene on Dec. 14 as an Electoral College to formally select the next president.

That approach has hit a brick wall even as Trump’s courtroom losses mount. Michigan on Monday certified its results showing Biden the winner. Pennsylvania’s governor said on Tuesday his state had done so as well. Trump won both states in his 2016 victory.

The Nevada Supreme Court on Tuesday also confirmed Biden had won the state, sending the results to Nevada’s Democratic governor for final certification, the Nevada secretary of state’s office said.

Reporting by Trevor Hunnicutt, David Morgan, Patricia Zengerle, Humeyra Pamuk; Additional reporting by David Brunnstrom, Doina Chiacu, Lisa Lambert, Karen Freifeld, Noeleen Walder and Tom Hals; Writing by Paul Simao: Editing by Ross Colvin and Will Dunham

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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